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Rufina Amaya, Survivor of the El Mozote Massacre

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Rufina Amaya, Survivor of the El Mozote Massacre

Remembrances

Rufina Amaya, Survivor of the El Mozote Massacre

Rufina Amaya, Survivor of the El Mozote Massacre

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/8972597/8972598" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Rufina Amaya died last week. She was one of the few survivors who spoke out after the Salvadoran Army's infamous 1981 massacre of villagers in El Mozote.

New York Times reporter Ray Bonner was one of the first reporters to travel to the village, several weeks after the massacre, to tell its story in January 1981. Amaya's tragic experience was central to his understanding of the government attack.

Bonner speaks with Scott Simon about Amaya's role in the telling of the El Mozote story.

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