NPR logo

Homeowners Host Essay Contest to Sell House

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/89803678/89803637" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Homeowners Host Essay Contest to Sell House

Diversions

Homeowners Host Essay Contest to Sell House

Homeowners Host Essay Contest to Sell House

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/89803678/89803637" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Todd and Tiffany Lovell are trying to unload their three-bedroom home near Los Alamos, N.M., in a depressed market. They're trying a gimmick made popular during the housing boom. They want potential buyers to submit essays about why they should win the house — along with a $100 entry fee.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

A pen could be used by some contestants hoping to win a home in New Mexico. Today's last word in business is essay contest. Todd and Tiffany Lovell are trying to unload their three-bedroom house near Los Alamos in a depressed market, and they're trying a gimmick made popular during the boom. They want you to write in 500 words or less why you should win their house and pay a $100 entry fee. The state's gaming board is deciding if the contest is a raffle - a game of luck which would be illegal in New Mexico - or if it's a question of skill, as the couple contends. So perhaps your English degree could finally pay you back.

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Copyright © 2008 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.