My Sister, My Mother: Family DNA Nabs Suspects

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Dennis Rader

Dennis Rader, who admitted to being the so-called "BTK killer," is escorted to prison in El Dorado, Kansas. Rader pleaded guilty after DNA evidence from his daughter linked him to 10 killings dating back to 1974. Larry W. Smith/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Larry W. Smith/AFP/Getty Images

It may usher in an age of genetic surveillance, but a law enforcement initiative to raid medical records for family DNA can be critical to solving crimes, according to Frederick Bieber, a medical geneticist and Harvard professor.

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