Get Closer to the 'BPP'

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What's clicking on the Bryant Park Project blog, including an introduction to our 1000th follower on Twitter and an invitation to join our Facebook group.

MIKE PESCA, host:

Bryant Park Project self-obsession continues with the following announcement. A major milestone was marked yesterday, major but virtual. Web editor Laura Conaway is right here with details. What happened in the world of the BPP?

LAURA CONAWAY: It was big. Did you guys feel the Earth shake?

PESCA: I was - I though it was maybe those Anzac cookies.

MARTIN: Ramble, ramble, ramble, ramble.

(Soundbite of laughter)

CONAWAY: Only if you're hanging out on the New Madrid Fault, does the ocean go - actually, what happened yesterday, was that we thought our one thousandth Twitter person...

(Soundbite of hand-clapping)

PESCA: Yeah.

CONAWAY: Who lives not so far from the New Madrid Fault. Twitter of course is where we yak all day long. We're at twitter.com/bpp, and people can come along and get a Twitter account, they're free, they're fun. And sign up to follow you, you sign up to follow other people. And what that means is that you then see everything they tweet all day, whether you want to or not.

PESCA: Uh-huh.

CONAWAY: So, yesterday during the show, I noticed that we were at number 999. And at first I wrote, well, we're poised at 999. And then I wrote, well OK, now we're officially stuck at 999.

(Soundbite of laughter)

CONAWAY: Because no one else would come along.

MARTIN: Come on, people.

PESCA: Was it like a desperate public radio pledge drive?

(Soundbite of laughter)

CONAWAY: I really felt like I was doing a pledge drive, yeah. But after the show, in clocked a follower, "Crazy Bananas".

MARTIN: That's appropriate, I think.

CONAWAY: Appropriate handle. It turns out to be Megan Peters, a young mom, lives in Kansas City, Missouri. And you know, I asked her, why come bumping along now?

Mrs. MEGAN PETERS (Twitter User, Kansas City, Missouri): This is very, very random, but today I started adding people on my Twitter friends. I didn't have any until today.

MARTIN: None.

PESCA: Oh.

MARTIN: None, none.

CONAWAY: Yeah.

MARTIN: And then she chose us. That makes me happy.

CONAWAY: How about that? I asked Megan actually, if she thought that, you know, there'd be some kind of prize that went along with being number 1,000. She said that she wanted to spend the day with Alison Stewart, when she gets back from maternity leave.

MARTIN: Oh.

CONAWAY: I can't promise that, but...

(Soundbite of laughter)

CONAWAY: She does have some advice for Alison Stewart, which, you know, is worth hearing, I think. Alison, if you're out there, and I know you are, here's some advice.

Mrs. PETERS: Mm, sleep as much as you can, and I don't know - yeah, sleep. Actually, my best friend just had a baby yesterday, and she's been calling me every other second asking for parenting advice, and I just keep telling her to rest while she's in the hospital, because she'll never get to rest again.

PESCA: Telling a new mom to sleep, is sort of like telling her, "and levitate and turn invisible."

(Soundbite of laughter)

CONAWAY: That's right. Well Alison Stewart, since you haven't had your baby yet, I don't think, go ahead and rest now, take some naps.

The other thing that's going on today, is that - there's still time to sign up for this week's BPP newsletter. I got to say this is one of the cooler things we do. It's short, it's sweet, it comes out through Facebook. Just get a Facebook account if you don't already have one, join our group. We're npr.org/bpp on Facebook.

MARTIN: Yeah, it always makes me so happy when I see I have a little Facebook message.

CONAWAY: Finally, a Facebook message, right?

MARTIN: Yeah.

CONAWAY: Yeah.

MARTIN: Exactly. Someone's finally writing me.

CONAWAY: We have one last thing actually, that I want to say. We started a thing called Luncheonette, which is a little noon-time snack of some type. Today, I don't want to tell you what it is yet because I don't want to spoil the surprise, but it's a video from Los Angeles that is, what they're doing is totally illegal, but it really looks like so fun you can't stand it.

PESCA: Strange how often those two things go together.

CONAWAY: And it makes kind of a citizen point, so it's illegal fun, with a point. Check it out, Luncheonette should go up right around noon.

PESCA: So the idea is it's a little snack we offer, a little morsel of something or other.

CONAWAY: Right, since we can't actually give you an Anzac cookie, we'll give you the recipe, but...

PESCA: Yeah, until the Twitter technology evolves to that point.

MARTIN: Very cool. Laura Conaway edits our Web site and blog. You can find us there at npr.org/bryantpark. And of course, Twitter feed, twitter.com/bpp and npr.org/bppfacebook. Thanks, Laura.

CONAWAY: Thank you.

PESCA: Coming up on the show, a ramble registered trademark through the day's news. News not quite fit for the front page. And they were on the show yesterday, the teen rock trio Smoosh. We loved them so much we're playing another song from their BPP performance. This is the Bryant Park Project from NPR News.

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