More Than 200 Injured as Tornadoes Blast Virginia

A series of tornados ripped across southeastern Virginia on Monday, damaging scores of homes and businesses and injuring more than 200 people. Hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep report on the scene around Suffolk, Va.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

The damage from yesterday's tornadoes stretches across 25 miles of Virginia. The storms damaged homes, businesses and cars around Suffolk, Virginia. The storms sent more than 200 people to the hospital with injuries ranging from broken bones to cuts from flying glass.

MONTAGNE: The hospital itself was grazed by one tornado, leaving blown-out windows but little other destruction. Steve Stone of the Virginian-Pilot newspaper described the damaged.

Mr. STEVE STONE (Virginian-Pilot): I hate to use the phrase, but it fits. It's a war zone. You're seeing homes that have just been utterly, completely blown apart, blasted apart. And it's not just one or two. It's one after another after another. And you can see the line of damage going through these neighborhoods.

INSKEEP: Dozens of homes were destroyed, thousands of people lost power, and Virginia's governor declared a state of emergency.

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