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South Korean Scientists Clone Drug-Sniffing Dog

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South Korean Scientists Clone Drug-Sniffing Dog

World

South Korean Scientists Clone Drug-Sniffing Dog

South Korean Scientists Clone Drug-Sniffing Dog

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A Labrador retriever named Chase, South Korea's top drug sniffer, may soon be able to do much more work. Chase now has seven genetically identical twins, born late last year.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Okay, if you ever wished you had a clone to do part of your work, then this is your moment to be envious of a dog. The dog is a Labrador Retriever named Chase. It's a working dog - South Korea's top drug sniffer. And it may soon be able to do much more work, because Chase now has seven genetically identical twins.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

These clones were born late last year. And the Korean customs service says it did this because it had 30 percent success rate in training naturally-born puppies. So by cloning the top dog, they figured they'd improve their odds. In the process, they made a scientific leap in an emerging field.

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