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Bush Urges Nation to Stick with Him on Iraq
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Bush Urges Nation to Stick with Him on Iraq

Iraq

Bush Urges Nation to Stick with Him on Iraq

Bush Urges Nation to Stick with Him on Iraq
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President Bush is calling on Americans to be patient as the Iraq war enters its fifth year. On Monday, he reiterated that while a withdrawal of U.S. troops would be an easy decision for the short term, it would have negative consequences for U.S. security in the long run.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

The war in Iraq has begun its fifth year and President Bush marked that moment yesterday with a call for patience.

President GEORGE W. BUSH: Four years after this war began, the fight is difficult. But it can be won. It will be won if we have the courage and resolve to see it through.

INSKEEP: The president focused much of his short, subdued speech on the plan to train Iraqi forces to secure Baghdad. He warned of the consequence of a troop withdrawal.

President BUSH: It can be tempting to look at the challenges in Iraq and conclude our best option is to pack up and go home. That may be satisfying in the short run, but I believe the consequences for American security would be devastating.

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