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Some Eateries Embrace Nutrition-Information Laws

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Some Eateries Embrace Nutrition-Information Laws

Business

Some Eateries Embrace Nutrition-Information Laws

Some Eateries Embrace Nutrition-Information Laws

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Dozens of cities and counties are considering laws to require restaurants to post nutritional information, either on posters or on the menu, because of concern about obesity. The restaurant industry opposes the laws, but Fortune Magazine reports that some restaurateurs view them as a marketing opportunity.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Forget about the latte, because today's last word in business is cheese fries. Dozens of cities and counties are considering laws to require restaurants to post nutritional information - either on posters or right on the menus. New York City has such a law. San Francisco and Seattle will soon have their own. And because of concern about rising level of obesity. Also surveys show lots of people want to know more about the food that they order.

The restaurant industry opposes these disclosure laws, but Fortune magazine reports that some restaurateurs view them as a marketing opportunity. They see it as a way to get out in front of something they may have to do anyway. Most restaurants though will probably still see an advantage in letting you order those cheese fries without reminding you what they might do to your waistline.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

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