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Authors Debate Ethics of Writing Private for Public

Author Interviews

Authors Debate Ethics of Writing Private for Public

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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In the age of Youtube, Facebook and Oprah, the line between private and public seems to be blurring. In a round-table discussion, three prominent writers — Annie Proulx, Uzodinma Iweala, and Michael Ondaatje — talk about the role of privacy in the public world of literature and the media. Is it ever right to tell private stories for the public good?

Guests:

Annie Proulx, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Shipping News and Brokeback Mountain

Michael Ondaatje, winner of the Booker Prize for The English Patient

Uzodinma Iweala, author of Beasts of No Nation, winner of the 2005 John Llewellyn Rhys prize