Man Who Held Daughter Captive to Plead Insanity Prosecutors are preparing the case against Josef Fritzl, a 73-year-old Austrian man who held his daughter captive for 24 years in his basement and fathered seven children with her. Fritzl's lawyer is preparing an insanity defense for his client, stating Fritzl has a serious mental disorder.
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Man Who Held Daughter Captive to Plead Insanity

Law

Man Who Held Daughter Captive to Plead Insanity

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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Prosecutors are preparing the case against Josef Fritzl, a 73-year-old Austrian man who held his daughter captive for 24 years in his basement and fathered seven children with her. Rudolf Mayer, Fritzl's lawyer, is preparing an insanity defense for his client, stating Fritzl has a serious mental disorder.

Insanity defenses in high profile cases often spark debate. How do the courts determine where legal responsibility ends and insanity begins?

Guests:

Dahlia Lithwick, senior legal correspondent and senior editor for Slate

Alan Dershowitz, defense attorney, and professor at Harvard Law School

Christopher Slobogin, professor of law at the University of Florida