Study: Number of Wireless-Only U.S. Homes Grows

More Americans are cancelling their landlines and using only wireless phones, according to a new study from the National Center for Health Statistics. In the last half of 2007, the number of homes without landlines — 16 percent — had more than doubled from the same period in 2004.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

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More and more Americans are canceling their landlines and using only wireless phones. A new study indicates nearly one out of every six households has only a wireless telephone now. That report comes from the National Center for Health Statistics. It shows that the number of homes without landlines has more than doubled just in the last few years. And as you might imagine, young people are the most likely to cut the cord. Our friends at USA Today reporting on this study say that among 25 to 29-year-olds, more than a third live in wireless only households.

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