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Miss. Democrat Snags House Seat Held by GOP

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Miss. Democrat Snags House Seat Held by GOP

Election 2008

Miss. Democrat Snags House Seat Held by GOP

Miss. Democrat Snags House Seat Held by GOP

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Mississippi Democrat Travis Childers won a special election to Congress on Tuesday. It's the third special election win for Democrats in recent months.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And that Mississippi win Congressman Van Hollen spoke, the Democratic candidate won in a strongly conservative district by espousing traditionally conservative values.

Representative TRAVIS CHILDERS (Democrat, Mississippi): I'm pro-life and pro-gun. I'm Travis Childers. I approved this message because I'll do in Congress what I've done in Mississippi: work with both parties, balance budgets and create jobs.

MONTAGNE: Democrat Travis Childers won the special election to Congress yesterday. It's the third time in recent months that Democrats have taken a seat in a district that had long been safe for Republicans. The Republican candidate lost in Mississippi, even though prominent Republicans campaigned for him, including Vice President Cheney and former presidential candidate Mike Huckabee.

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