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Brisk Scooter Sales Tied to High Gas Prices

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Brisk Scooter Sales Tied to High Gas Prices

Business

Brisk Scooter Sales Tied to High Gas Prices

Brisk Scooter Sales Tied to High Gas Prices

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/90462067/90462036" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Scooter dealers across the country are reporting brisk sales, especially of models that get 75 to 100 mpg. A dealer in California says 95 percent of people who come in mention high gasoline prices, and a dealer in South Dakota says even people who don't fit the biker mode are buying.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And today's last word in business might mean a little less business for gas station owners. And the word is scooters. Scooter dealers across the country are recording brisk sales, especially of models that get 75 to 100 miles per gallon. A dealer in California says 95 percent of people who come in mention high gas prices.

A dealer in South Dakota says even people who do not fit the biker model are buying, like a restaurant owner who recently bought a bright red Honda scooter. Her family was not used to her being on a motor bike, and the 51-year-old says they were so worried about her safety they made her wear a mesh lime green vest and reflective tape when she scoots back and forth to work.

Actually, that would be a nice fashion statement. Good accessory for the red motorbike.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

On you. On you.

INSKEEP: On me. Yes. Lime green, it's my color.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

MONTAGNE: And I'm Renee Montagne.

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