Communities Take Action to Protect Great Lakes

Ducks fly over Lake Michigan as steam comes off the water i i

Steam rises off Lake Michigan near Milwaukee, Wis. Michigan and Wisconsin recently signed on to The Great Lakes Water Compact, an agreement that lays out rules for conservation and water use among regions that border the Lakes. Darren Hauck/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Darren Hauck/Getty Images
Ducks fly over Lake Michigan as steam comes off the water

Steam rises off Lake Michigan near Milwaukee, Wis. Michigan and Wisconsin recently signed on to The Great Lakes Water Compact, an agreement that lays out rules for conservation and water use among regions that border the Lakes.

Darren Hauck/Getty Images
People swim in Lake Michigan near Chicago, Ill. i i

Beachgoers in Chicago seek relief from summer heat on the shores of Lake Michigan. Tim Boyle/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Tim Boyle/Getty Images
People swim in Lake Michigan near Chicago, Ill.

Beachgoers in Chicago seek relief from summer heat on the shores of Lake Michigan.

Tim Boyle/Getty Images

The five Great Lakes — Ontario, Erie, Huron, Michigan and Superior — are said to hold one-fifth of the world's surface fresh water. Communities surrounding the Great Lakes are working to protect the major fresh water resource, which is threatened by fluctuating water levels, invasive species and pollution.

The Great Lakes Water Compact, which covers the eight states and two Canadian provinces bordering the lakes, lays out rules for conservation and water use in the region. Wisconsin and Michigan have just signed on to the compact.

In a special live broadcast from Milwaukee, Wis., host Ira Flatow talks with experts about the health of the lakes and what communities surrounding the lakes are doing to deal with issues affecting their water resources.

Guests:

Peter Annin, former Newsweek correspondent; author of The Great Lakes Water Wars,; associate director of the Institutes for Journalism and Natural Resources

Michael Hahn, chief environmental engineer, Southeastern Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission (SEWRPC)

Rebecca Klaper, assistant scientist at the Great Lakes WATER Institute at the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee

Val Klump, director and senior scientist at the Great Lakes WATER Institute at the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee

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