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The Hot New Trend: Manure

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The Hot New Trend: Manure

Business

The Hot New Trend: Manure

The Hot New Trend: Manure

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Chemical fertilizer has tripled in price in the past year. And farmers are returning to the old ways: spreading manure on their fields instead of treating it as a worthless byproduct.

Some farmers are finding they can make more profit using their beef cattle to produce manure than they'd make on their meat; others are looking for new ways to maximize the "output" of their livestock, including investing in expensive equipment to capture methane in a chicken house.

Meanwhile, the growing ranks of organic produce farmers are suddenly finding that their manure suppliers will no longer supply them.

New Hampshire Public Radio's Dan Gorenstein reports.