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The Oral Sex Myth

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The Oral Sex Myth

Science

The Oral Sex Myth

The Oral Sex Myth

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/90629477/90629469" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A new study finds little evidence to support media reports that teens have become far more likely to engage in oral sex in lieu of sexual intercourse. Sponsored by the Guttmacher Institute, which focuses on sexual and reproductive health research, the study found that among 15 to 19 year olds, half had engaged in intercourse, while a slightly higher number had engaged in oral sex. Madeleine Brand talks with Rachel Jones, an author of the study.

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