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Top of the News

Top of the News

Top of the News

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The latest headlines.

BILL WOLFF: This is NPR.

(Soundbite of music)

MARK GARRISON: Thank you, Mike. Oregon and Kentucky delivered victories to both Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton last night, but it was Obama who went to bed claiming a major milestone. NPR's Mara Liasson has more.

MARA LIASSON: Clinton beat Obama in Kentucky by 35 points, much bigger than his margin in Oregon. But Obama's victory party celebrated a different achievement, reaching a majority of pledged delegates available in all the Democratic primaries and caucuses.

(Soundbite of crowd cheering)

Senator BARACK OBAMA (Democrat, Illinois): And you have put us within reach of the Democratic nomination for president of the United States of America.

LIASSON: Obama now needs far fewer than 100 delegates to clinch the nomination. His victory party was in Iowa, the state where he won his first victory. Iowa is also an important swing state in the general election, and Obama is now focusing most of his attention on his likely battle against Republican John McCain.

GARRISON: NPR's Mara Liasson reporting. We'll have more from her later this hour with an analysis of the results and a look at the political road ahead. A top McCain aide is keeping his word not to campaign against Obama. Mark McKinnon is McCain's chief ad man. He said last year he did not want to be part of the race if Obama were the Democratic nominee. Last night he made it official and left the campaign. He says he's still voting for McCain, though. McKinnon is a former Democrat who worked for President Bush in the 2000 and 2004 campaigns.

The R. Kelly child porn trial has gone to the videotape. Jurors watched the sex tape that's at the center of the case. Natalie Moore of Chicago Public Radio has more.

NATALIE MOORE: The lights dimmed and the blinds closed. Jurors watched nearly a half hour of graphic sexual acts between a male and female. They appear to be in a basement with a log-cabin motif. Prosecutors say the man is Kelly and the female, an underage girl, is as young as 13. Kelly's defense team says the R&B star is not the man in the video. They say Kelly has a mole on his lower back, which they argue is not seen in the video. The alleged victim lives in Chicago but will not be testifying.

GARRISON: Chicago Public Radio's Natalie Moore reporting. To sports, where the NBA Conference Finals are underway, the Boston Celtics beat the Detroit Pistons to take a one-nothing lead in the Eastern Conference Finals. In the West, the San Antonio Spurs take on the Lakers in Los Angeles tonight.

For the first time, a woman has won "Dancing with the Stars." Maybe it's not the most important glass ceiling around, but champion figure skater Kristi Yamaguchi enjoyed breaking it anyhow. Men have won all four previous competitions.

Also, the price of a regular movie ticket has hit 12 bucks in Manhattan. Clearview Cinemas jacked their prices this week. At first, they stopped discounting kids and seniors. That didn't go over well, so they're putting the discounts back in place today. That is your news and other stuff. If you want more, it's always online at npr.org.

WOLFF: This is NPR.

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