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No Home Away from Home for Quake Evacuees

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No Home Away from Home for Quake Evacuees

No Home Away from Home for Quake Evacuees

No Home Away from Home for Quake Evacuees

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/90694406/90695455" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Chong Cho Ching (left), 70, is originally from Wenchun, which is near the epicenter of the earthquake in Sichuan. She evacuated to the park. She is pictured here with her granddaughter Ma Fu Jen. Art Silverman/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Art Silverman/NPR

Chong Cho Ching (left), 70, is originally from Wenchun, which is near the epicenter of the earthquake in Sichuan. She evacuated to the park. She is pictured here with her granddaughter Ma Fu Jen.

Art Silverman/NPR

A thousand evacuees are living in 60 emergency housing units and 20 tents in a public park in Chengdu, China. They are living 10 and 12 to a room.

NPR's Robert Siegel talks with evacuees, some of whom are from the worst-hit mountain towns.

They have roofs over their heads, emergency beds to sleep on, food and family. But no one would call it home.

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