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BILL WOLFF: This is NPR.

MARK GARRISON: Thank you. They're evacuating in California where thousands of acres are on fire. Bob Hensley of member station KXJZ has that story.

BOB HENSLEY: The wild fire has engulfed at least a dozen homes, threatens dozens of others, and has resulted in about 18 hundred Santa Cruz county residents to be forced or asked to flee their homes. Despite the extensive property damage there haven't been any reports of serious injuries. Various shelters have been set up throughout the area, and the county fairground has been opened to hundreds of animals, including about 250 horses. Fire fighters faced quite a challenge Thursday as 40-mile-per-hour winds pushed the flames through thousands of acres of dry brush and timber. Reinforcements are expected to arrive by Friday morning. Only a small portion of the blaze has been contained. Officials haven't determined how the fire started.

GARRISON: Bob Hensley of member station KXJZ reporting. Crews around the country are cleaning up after tornados ripped through four states yesterday. At least one person died in Colorado. The tornado there destroyed dozens of homes then moved on to Wyoming. There were also twisters in California and Kansas. Controversial pastors are apparently in style this campaign season. This time, it's Republican John McCain's turn to reject a man of the cloth. NPR's Scott Horsley has more.

SCOTT HORSLEY: This was John McCain three months ago when he accepted John Hagee's endorsement shortly before the Texas primary.

Senator JOHN MCCAIN (Republican, Arizona): Pastor Hagee I am grateful for your support. I am grateful for your guidance. I am grateful for your leadership.

HORSLEY: This was John McCain last week after Hagee apologized for using anti-Catholic slurs like, the great whore.

Senator MCCAIN: I accepted his endorsement, I didn't endorse everything that he said.

HORSLEY: Now, McCain has gone further, rejecting Hagee's endorsement all together. The move comes after a taped service of an old sermon in which Hagee, a leader of the Christian Zionist movement, said God sent Hitler to help Jews reach the Promised Land. McCain says he was unaware of Hagee's controversial remarks before accepting the endorsement, even though Hagee says he was actively courted by the campaign.

GARRISON: NPR's Scott Horsley with that story. John McCain's campaign released eight years of his medical records. McCain will turn 72 in August. If he wins he would be the oldest elected president, so the campaign wants voters to see him as fit for the job. The records show he appears to be skin cancer-free, and healthy over all. McCain had early-stage melanoma spots removed three times as recently as 2002.

To sports, where the Boston Celtics and Detroit Pistons are all tied up in the NBA's Eastern Conference finals. Detroit won last night to tie the series one game to one. Tonight the LA Lakers host the San Antonio Spurs in the Western Conference finals. Lakers are up in that series one to nothing. More sports, later this hour, the NHL Stanley Cup Finals start this weekend. I have a conversation on that coming up. That's your news and that's your sports. It's always online at npr.org.

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