NPR logo

Memorial Day Travel Inches Down, Survey Shows

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/90755770/90755737" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Memorial Day Travel Inches Down, Survey Shows

Memorial Day Travel Inches Down, Survey Shows

Memorial Day Travel Inches Down, Survey Shows

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/90755770/90755737" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A survey from AAA shows that the number of people traveling 50 miles or more from home this year is down compared with last year's Memorial Day weekend — but it's only down by about 1 percent. Spokesman Mike Pina says about 6 million people are flying and more than 31 million will hit the roads.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And all this talk about recession and the reality of high gas prices is making some people reconsider how much they spend on travel. A survey from AAA shows that the number of people traveling 50 miles or more from home this year is down compared to last year's Memorial Day weekend. It's down nearly 1 percent. And that figure leads AAA spokesman Mike Pina to this conclusion.

Mr. MIKE PINA (AAA): There are a small number of people who are going to choose to spend their holiday weekend on their deck with a beer and a grill. But for the vast majority of Americans gas prices are high, but they're not high enough to not take their kids on vacation or not take the time off that they had put in for months ago.

Pina says about six million people are flying and more than 31 million will hit the roads. Meaning your major worry this weekend may not be gas prices, it'll be traffic.

Copyright © 2008 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.