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Big Aftershock Jolts Quake-Hit Province in China

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Big Aftershock Jolts Quake-Hit Province in China

World Story of the Day

Big Aftershock Jolts Quake-Hit Province in China

Big Aftershock Jolts Quake-Hit Province in China

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/90813416/90812291" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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A large aftershock hit China's Sichuan province Sunday morning, rattling buildings 800 miles away in Beijing. At least 1 person was killed and hundreds injured, according to the state-run China News Service.

Scores of homes reportedly collapsed and roads were damaged during what the U.S. Geological Survey said was a magnitude-5.8 tremor. The aftershock comes as Sichan province is still reeling from the initial earthquake nearly two weeks ago that killed tens of thousands of people.

Correspondent Anthony Kuhn was in a mountain village in Beichuan County — one of the province's hardest-hit areas — to speak with a small ethnic minority group to see how they were affected by the May 12 quake and how they planned to preserve their culture.

"All of a sudden, the mountainside I was on started heaving and shaking very violently," Kuhn tells Ari Shapiro. "And immediately everyone came charging out of their houses, saying to me, 'Get out, get out.' And they huddled in the village square ... and they all huddled around me — I think partly to protect me but also out of just sheer terror, which you could see etched in their faces."

Kuhn says the shaking lasted about five or six seconds. The villagers, who have been living in government -supplied tents since the earthquake, were fearful of boulders shaking loose from the mountain and rolling down to crush them.

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