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McCain's Search for a Running Mate

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McCain's Search for a Running Mate

Election 2008

McCain's Search for a Running Mate

McCain's Search for a Running Mate

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/90813457/90812303" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Republican Sen. John McCain is playing host to three potential vice presidential candidates — Florida Gov. Charlie Crist, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal and former GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney — this weekend at his home in Sedona, Ariz. Sunday Soapbox blogger Mindy Finn examines McCain's quest for a running mate.

ARI SHAPIRO, host:

Republican John McCain is hosting three potential vice presidential candidates at his home in Sedona, Arizona, this weekend. They're Florida Governor Charlie Crist, Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal, and former GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney.

WEEKEND EDITION Sunday's blogger Mindy Finn used to work for Romney.

MINDY FINN: Conventional wisdom during the tumultuous Republican presidential primary season was that McCain personally deplored Romney. If the desire is to pick a vice president who can carry his home state, McCain probably can't count on that from Romney. Massachusetts is historically one of the most liberal states in the U.S.

And whether it should be or not, Romney's Mormon religion turns off many of the conservatives McCain has struggled to court.

The old cliché applies here: Nobody is perfect. Also, the conventional wisdom of the 2008 presidential campaign is that there is no conventional wisdom. So who will it be, and will the rendezvous in Arizona get McCain closer to political matrimony?

SHAPIRO: You can check out political strategist Mindy Finn's entire audio post at NPR.org/SundaySoapbox.

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