NPR logo

Americans Have Hopes, Doubts, on Safety Net

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/9083513/9083514" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Americans Have Hopes, Doubts, on Safety Net

Americans Have Hopes, Doubts, on Safety Net

Americans Have Hopes, Doubts, on Safety Net

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/9083513/9083514" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The latest Pew Research poll on political attitudes and core values of Americans indicates that while there is an increasing amount of support for a government-supported social safety net, Americans are less confident in the country as a whole.

Michele Norris talks with Andrew Kohut, Director of the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press, who compares the new data to polling going back to 1987.

Kohut says that a shift in emphasis from security issues to safety net and income inequality issues favors the Democratic Party.

But the Democratic Party's overall standing with the public is no better than it was in 2001, when President Bush was first inaugurated. Instead, it is the Republican Party that has rapidly lost public support, according to Kohut.