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At Cannes, a Broad Menu, Plus Critical Indigestion

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At Cannes, a Broad Menu, Plus Critical Indigestion

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At Cannes, a Broad Menu, Plus Critical Indigestion

At Cannes, a Broad Menu, Plus Critical Indigestion

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/90850612/90853634" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Vogue film critic John Powers also writes for the LA Weekly and The Village Voice. hide caption

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Fresh Air's critic at large went to the Cannes Film Festival this month — and today he reports back on the celebrity-chasing, the political posturing, and oh yes, the cinema he saw.

Powers says this year's movies weren't half bad — even the geopolitical polemics, he says, were at least interestingly made — but with U.S.-based movie critics being laid off in droves, the festival had a gloomy, fatalistic vibe, at least for American attendees. He tells Terry Gross about these dynamics, about the festival prize winners and about the movie that didn't take an award — Steven Soderbergh's 4-and-a-half-hour art film Che, a $65 million "folly" that Powers says has an unmistakable artistic integrity, but which is "almost unreleasable" as presented at Cannes.

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