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Dutch Mail to Include Stamps Paid for by Ads

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Dutch Mail to Include Stamps Paid for by Ads

Business

Dutch Mail to Include Stamps Paid for by Ads

Dutch Mail to Include Stamps Paid for by Ads

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At the moment, it costs the equivalent of 59 cents, U.S., to mail a letter. But starting next month, Dutch consumers who don't want to spend that money, can order a pack of envelopes with stamps for free. The envelopes are being offered by a local ad agency, which has placed ads on the back of the envelopes. Consumers who request them also have to agree to receive MORE ads by mail or e-mail.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Our last word in personal finance is postage. The cost of mailing a letter is about to go up to 41 cents. You can save money by buying lots of Forever Stamps. That's a U.S. Postal Service innovation where the price is locked in no matter if the cost goes up in the future.

A Dutch company is also offering a novel way to help consumers save on mail money. Dutch letter writers simply need to put up with a little advertising. Starting next month, the local ad agency will offer envelopes with free stamps. The envelopes have ads on the back and consumers who request them have to agree to receive more ads by mail or e-mail.

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