Replay Smoosh Raises the Lights with 'Dark Shine'

We put a quarter in the Bryant Park Project Jukebox and listen to an in-studio performance from Smoosh.

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RACHEL MARTIN, host:

I need some money. You got any money?

MIKE PESCA, host:

Yeah, I've got a couple chain - loose change.

MARTIN: Loose change? Good. I just need one quarter.

PESCA: All right, I got that. I'm going to dig. I've got to dig for it. Here.

MARTIN: Oh, you really do. Oh, good.

PESCA: What do you mean, really?

(Soundbite of laughter)

PESCA: Yes, of course. Here.

(Soundbite of coin clinking on table)

PESCA: Here you go.

MARTIN: OK, I'm in the mood for some music. All we need is this quarter. This one 25-cent piece is...

PESCA: Which state is on the other side? Or is it an eagle?

MARTIN: I'm looking.

PESCA: I'm hoping - it would be cool if...

MARTIN: Delaware, the first state.

PESCA: Ooh, really?

MARTIN: And this is our key to some awesome tune-age, courtesy of the BPP Jukebox. I'm in the mood for a little Smoosh action. This group, this trio, 11, 14 and 16 years old, they came in and played in the BPP office and here they are playing their song "Dark Shine" live from our own BPP world. Thanks for the quarter, Mike.

PESCA: You got it.

MARTIN: Let's get it going.

(Soundbite of jukebox)

(Soundbite of song "Dark Shine")

SMOOSH (Singing): And if you want it, I hope it's easy, You can try, and when you figure out...

And if you want it, I hope it's easy, You can try, and when you figure out That there's no easy way out. You know what to say, you try and you're waiting.

Ooh, ooh. Ooh, ooh. Ooh, ooh. Ooh, ooh, ah, ah.

And if you want it, I hope it's easy. You know what to say, you try and you're waiting.

Ooh, ooh. Ooh, ooh. Ooh, ooh, ah, ah.

And if you want it, I hope it's easy. You know what to say, when you try and you're waiting.

If you call me on this, I'm right, I'm righter (ph). If you call me on this, I'm right, I'm righter. If you call me on this, I'm right, I'm righter. If you call me on this, I'm right, I'm righter.

Ooh, ooh. Ooh, ooh. Ooh, ooh, ah, ah.

And if you want it, I hope it's easy. And if you want it, I hope it's easy (there's no easy way out). And if you want it, I hope it's easy (there's no easy way out). And if you want it, I hope it's easy (there's no easy way out).

Out.

And if you want it, I hope it's easy. And if you got it, I hope it's easy. And if you want it, I hope it's easy. And if you want it, I hope it's easy.

Ah, ah. Ah, ah (ooh, ooh, ooh). Oh, ooh, oh, oh...

MARTIN: That's Smoosh, playing their song, "Dark Shine," live from the BPP. And that does it for this hour of the Bryant Park Project. We don't go away online, npr.org/bryantpark. I'm Rachel Martin.

PESCA: And I am Mike Pesca. This is the Bryant Park Project from NPR News.

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Sister Band Smoosh Rocks Kids-at-Work Day

Video: "Dark Shine"

Smoosh "Dark Shine" (200)
Zena Barakat/NPR

Smoosh is a band of three sisters, all born after Bill Clinton was first elected president, Michael Jordan was in his prime and Nirvana released its ground-breaking album Nevermind.

This week, the Seattle-based trio stopped by the BPP offices, where they performed acoustic versions of two new songs — in a cubicle.

The idea was to mark the nation's annual Take Your Daughters and Sons to Work Day. The occasion started as a way to get kids, particularly girls, valuable time in their parents' workplaces. In some quarters, it's considered an unavoidable burden in corporate life.

Some workers complain about being distracted by the noise of youngsters — not to mention the racket of a rock band. Others have been pressed into service entertaining the tots.

The girls in Smoosh are able to entertain not just themselves, but the entire Bryant Park Project office.

Asya, 16, plays the keyboards, sings lead and writes the lyrics. Chloe, 14, plays the drums and also sings. They arrange the songs together. Maia, 11, just joined the band last summer as the bass player.

They may be young, but the trio has already opened for Pearl Jam, Death Cab for Cutie and Sleater-Kinney.

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