U.K. Brewer Plugs Earth-Friendly Beer

The U.K.'s Adnam's brewing company says its new brew, called "East Green," is made in a way that reduces potential damage to the environment.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And our last word in business comes from a brewery in the U.K. The word is carbon-neutral beer. Don't worry, it's still fizzy, but Adnam's Brewing company says its new brew, called East Green, is made in a way that reduces potential damage to the environment. It's made with locally grown barley to reduce carbon emissions from transportation, steam is recycled from the brewing process and used to heat the next batch. Emma Hibbard is a manager at the brewery, and she calls East Green a proper English beer.

Ms. EMMA HIBBARD (Manager, Adnam): The taste, it's slightly citrusy, quite grassy and fresh taste, which we like to serve cool. And it really is a perfect drink to enjoy in the English sunshine.

MONTAGNE: You won't, though, be enjoying it stateside. The company says it has no plans at the moment to market its green beer in the U.S.

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne, with Steve Inskeep in Karachi, Pakistan.

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