Minn. Military Families Cope With Long Deployment

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Jodi Kramer and her six children at their home in Ellsworth, Minn. i

Jodi Kramer and her six children at their home in Ellsworth, Minn. Jodi's husband, Don Kramer, is now scheduled to return home in July, after a 22-month deployment with the Minnesota National Guard. John McChesney, NPR hide caption

itoggle caption John McChesney, NPR
Jodi Kramer and her six children at their home in Ellsworth, Minn.

Jodi Kramer and her six children at their home in Ellsworth, Minn. Jodi's husband, Don Kramer, is now scheduled to return home in July, after a 22-month deployment with the Minnesota National Guard.

John McChesney, NPR

Several weeks ago, the 2,600 members of the Minnesota National Guard were preparing come home from Iraq. But they were soon notified that they would need to stay an extra four months as part of President Bush's troop increase.

By the time they return home in July, they will have been deployed for a total of 22 months, the longest brigade-level deployment in the history of the National Guard.

Family members across the state are trying to cope with the extension.

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