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Climate Change Legislation Fails in Senate

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Climate Change Legislation Fails in Senate

Environment

Climate Change Legislation Fails in Senate

Climate Change Legislation Fails in Senate

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/91238379/91238422" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The U.S. Senate debated proposed climate change legislation on Tuesday — but the bill failed to win the needed number of votes to avoid a filibuster and was pulled from the floor.

The bill would have cut greenhouse gas emissions by two-thirds by the year 2050, largely by means of a cap-and-trade system. Amendments offered to the legislation would have increased funding for nuclear power, wind and solar, and funded research into carbon sequestration technology.

President Bush had threatened to veto the legislation if it passed Congress, saying that it was likely to severely damage the economy and drive jobs overseas, while creating a massive new bureaucracy. Guests and callers talk about the bill and discuss future prospects for climate change legislation.

Guests:

Darren Samuelsohn, senior reporter, Greenwire, E & E Publishing, Inc.

Manik Roy, director of congressional affairs, The Pew Center on Global Climate Change