Noise in Spinning Class

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Scott Simon notes the case of the student in the spinning class in New York who couldn't stand one of his fellow spinners' shouting and grunting and took matters into his own hands.

SCOTT SIMON, host:

Christopher Carter went into Manhattan Criminal Court this week with some anxieties. By the time he left, he may wonder if he should run for mayor. Mr. Carter, a stockbroker, was charged with assault. He reached a kind of breaking point last August with a man named Stuart Sugarman, senior partner at an investment firm who had irritated Mr. Carter in their spin class at an Upper East Side health club. Mr. Sugarman, by all accounts, grunted heavily as he exercised and hollered things like, "You go, girl!" and "Good burn!"

When he declined to quiet down, Mr. Carter lifted Mr. Sugarman's stationary exercise bike and slammed it down. Mr. Sugarman says he hurt his back and neck. After 10 hours of deliberation, jurors said they couldn't say conclusively that Mr. Carter had caused any injury to Mr. Sugarman. They didn't seem to have much sympathy for Mr. Sugarman.

B.J. Tormon, a nursing student, told The New York Times, stuff like that happens in the gym. Mr. Sugarman plans to file a civil lawsuit against Mr. Carter and the fitness club. Go for the burn!

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