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Pentagon Report Cites Errors After Tillman's Death
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Pentagon Report Cites Errors After Tillman's Death

U.S.

Pentagon Report Cites Errors After Tillman's Death

Pentagon Report Cites Errors After Tillman's Death
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Reenactment Video

The Department of Defense releases U.S. Army investigators' video of a reenactment of the incident in which Tillman was killed.

Military vehicle, from video screen grab.
Dept. of Defense Video

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Pentagon investigators said they found no criminal negligence in the death of Cpl. Pat Tillman, a former NFL star who left football to join the Army Rangers. But investigators found that officers in command made critical errors in investigating and reporting his April 2004 death — and in recommending Tillman for a silver star.

The Pentagon's inspector general said that investigators found a long string of errors — in each of three internal investigations into the incident and in the way the army notified Tillman's family of what happened.

Investigators said they found nine officers who were responsible for the errors — including Lt. Gen. Stanley McChrystal, commander of the Joint Special Operations Command.

But Acting Inspector General Thomas Gimble said that he did not believe there was an attempt to cover up the facts of Tillman's death.

The Army will decide what actions to take against the officers and review Tillman's Silver Star.

Congressman Michael Honda represents the 15th District of California, where Pat Tillman's family lives, and has pressed for the Pentagon to investigate his death. He talks with Melissa Block about the report.

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