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Women's Colleges Decline in U.S., Rise Globally

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Women's Colleges Decline in U.S., Rise Globally

Education

Women's Colleges Decline in U.S., Rise Globally

Women's Colleges Decline in U.S., Rise Globally

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There used to be more than 200 women's colleges in the U.S.; now there are about 60. But the few that are left are being used as a model for a growing number of women-only colleges overseas.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And today's last word in business is about higher education for women. There used to be more than 200 women's colleges in the United States. Now there are only about 60. Fewer men's colleges, too; coed colleges dominate. The few women's colleges that are left are being used as a model for a growing number of women-only colleges overseas. Developing nations in Asia, Africa and the Middle East see educating women as a key to economic growth. And this year in Bangladesh, the Asian University for Women was established. In Zimbabwe, the Women's University in Africa was set up six years ago. Dubai Women's College was founded in 1989. There is some tradition here. In South Korea, there's a women's university that's been around more than 50 years, and it produced the country's first female prime minister.

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