Calif. Lawmakers Target Black Market HOV Stickers

There's another battle brewing in California — and like just about everything in the Golden State, it's happening on the highway. Legislators are trying to crack down on the black market for a little yellow sticker that allows drivers of hybrid vehicles to use carpool lanes when they're driving solo.

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ANDREA SEABROOK, host:

There's another battle brewing in California and like just about everything in the Golden State, it's happening on the highway. Legislators are trying to crack down on the black market for a little yellow sticker. That sticker allows drivers of hybrid vehicles to use carpool lanes when they're driving alone.

And get this, in Los Angeles cars with the stickers can park for free at city meters. California issued just 85,000 of the stickers and now they're all gone; no more. So stickers the state originally sold for $8 apiece have attracted bids as high as $400 online. That's according to the Sacramento Bee. Proof that some hybrid owners are interested in more than one kind of green.

The legislation pending in the California state assembly would make it illegal to sell forged carpool stickers or resell the authentic ones. So take note all you hybrid scofflaws, no more life in the fast lane for you.

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