Scooters' Stigma Fades in U.S. as Sales Rise Scooter sales have jumped in the U.S. along with gasoline prices, and the stigma attached to scooters may be fading. Some may think they're reserved for sissies or people who've had their licenses revoked, but one scooter rider in Pennsylvania considers his Vespa the equivalent of a Maserati.
NPR logo

Scooters' Stigma Fades in U.S. as Sales Rise

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/91544411/91544376" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Scooters' Stigma Fades in U.S. as Sales Rise

Scooters' Stigma Fades in U.S. as Sales Rise

Scooters' Stigma Fades in U.S. as Sales Rise

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/91544411/91544376" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Scooter sales have jumped in the U.S. along with gasoline prices, and the stigma attached to scooters may be fading. Some may think they're reserved for sissies or people who've had their licenses revoked, but one scooter rider in Pennsylvania considers his Vespa the equivalent of a Maserati.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Scooter sales are rising in the United States. It's a sign that many people are worried about gas prices. And the stigma attached to scooters may be fading as sales increase. So scooter is today's last word in business. A scooter driver told a local newspaper in Pennsylvania that some people think scooter riders are sissies. And a dealer in North Carolina recalled how scooters used to be called liquor cycles because people thought you rode one after you lost your license. But a scooter driver in Pennsylvania considers his Vespa the equivalent of a Maserati now. And the best reason of all to buy a scooter my come from the driver of a Hummer in South Carolina. He says what he spends in gas in a month, his scooter-driving friend doesn't spend in a year.

And that's the two-wheeled business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

Copyright © 2008 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.