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L.A. Company Buys TV's Dance Classic 'Soul Train'

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L.A. Company Buys TV's Dance Classic 'Soul Train'

L.A. Company Buys TV's Dance Classic 'Soul Train'

L.A. Company Buys TV's Dance Classic 'Soul Train'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/91573890/91573848" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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The New York Times reports that the classic TV dance show Soul Train has a new owner. A Los Angeles production company bought the franchise from its creator, Don Cornelius. The new owners say they aim to bring what Spike Lee once called an urban music "time capsule" into the 21st century.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

Unidentified Man: Right now we'd like to hitch you to the Soul Train line. It gives everybody a chance to kind of (unintelligible) a while. And it's something you might want to get into on your own, is probably the dances.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

Our last word in business today is "Soul Train." The New York Times reports that the classic TV dance show has a new owner. A production company in L.A. has bought the franchise from its creator, Don Cornelius. He also produced and hosted the show for many years. "Soul Train" debuted in 1971 and during its heyday was the place to go to hear the best in black music and see the newest dances, fashions, and hairstyles. Over the years guests included icons like James Brown and Aretha Franklin and newer styles like hip-hop. The new owners say they aim to bring what Spike Lee once called an urban music time capsule into the 21st century.

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