BPP Jukebox: The Dodos Play 'Fools'

Guitarist and singer Merrick Long and drummer Logan Kroeber of the Dodos stopped by the Bryant Park Project's studios to play their song, "Fools."

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MIKE PESCA, host:

It has been a good year for the band the Dodos. Guitarist and singer Merrick Long's warm vocals and intricate finger-picked guitars knit together, with stomping rhythms of drummer Logan Kroeber, have proved compelling. The duo stopped by the BPP the week their first record - the interestingly spelled "Visiter," that's E-R, not O-R - became available to the world. Then they went on tour and stayed on tour.

This week, the Dodos return from a long stretch of dates in Europe for a long stretch of dates in the U.S. and Canada, starting this Thursday in their hometown of San Francisco. They'll be out on the road all summer, playing intimate shows and giant festival stages alike. But we've got them right here, right now, in jukebox form, at least. Here are the Dodos playing "Fools" live in BPP Studios. No standing in lines for the bathroom, no camera phones, just a quarter.

(Soundbite of jukebox)

(Soundbite of song "Fools")

THE DODOS: (Singing) Our fathers have been entangled in things. He's been squandering. He's been squandering. And we don't do a thing, 'cause we're busy and think. We're just wandering, We're just a-wandering like fools, fools, fools. Fools, fools, fools. Fools, fools, fools. Fools, fools, fools.

His son is his prize. He tells a few lies. He's got his father's eyes. It's in his father's eyes. And he thinks in his mind that he's just getting by. But he's a compromise, He's just a compromising fool, fool, fool. Fool, fool, fool. Fool, fool, fool. Fool, fool, fool.

And the stance that we take isn't much to bear. Yeah, we leave things to change on their time. And our failure to care for it leaves us blind, 'Til we're tired and we're crazed in the mind. Oh, oh, oh, oh.

Now he lies on his back, and they tell him it's that. It's just a heart attack. It's just a heart attack. Too late to return to the ones that you've earned. No, they don't give it back, No, they don't give it back to fools, fools, fools. Fools, fools, fools. Fools, fools, fools. Fools, fools, fools.

And the stance that we take isn't much to bear. Yeah, we leave things to change on their time. And our failure to care for it leaves us blind, 'Til we're tired and we're crazed in the mind. Oh, oh, oh, oh.

I've been, I've been silent. I've been, I've been silent. You've been, I've been silent. I've been, I've been silent. I've been, I've been silent.

You've been, I've been silent. I've been, I've been silent. I've been, I've been silent.

PESCA: Those were the Dodos playing "Fools." No, not playing us for fools in BPP Studios. If you want to watch video of the Dodos, and check out their interesting spellings, go to npr.org/bryantpark. And that does it. That wraps it up for this exciting hour of the BPP. Let's reflect on what we learned today. Buy a motorcycle, but wear a helmet, because the group won't tell you to.

We also learned that Barack Obama has a lot of pollsters, and finally, we learned that opera is good for you, although not necessarily going to be a gangbuster hit if it's about Al Gore. That was my takeaway from that conversation at least.

It's nice to have an hour of a little bit of reflection after an hour of the BPP. We are always online at npr.org/bryantpark. I am Mike Pesca, and this is the Bryant Park Project from NPR News.

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