In 'Torture Team,' An Administration Accused

Philippe Sands argues that U.S. torture policies were issued from the top down. i i

hide captionPhilippe Sands argues that U.S. interrogation policies were issued from the top down.

Public Broadcasting Service
Philippe Sands argues that U.S. torture policies were issued from the top down.

Philippe Sands argues that U.S. interrogation policies were issued from the top down.

Public Broadcasting Service

In his new book, Torture Team: Rumsfeld's Memo and the Betrayal of American Values, international lawyer Philippe Sands accuses former Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld of condoning sensory deprivation and humiliation during interrogations at Guantanamo Bay.

Sands says that the harsh interrogation policy that emerged after Sept. 11 came from high-ranking government officials and top military figures. His book explains how the military veered from the strict interrogation protocols set forth in the Army's field manual to using methods inspired by the prime-time television show 24.

Sands is a professor of law at University College London, where he is director of the Centre of International Courts and Tribunals. He is also a British Queen's Counsel at the firm Matrix Chambers.

Books Featured In This Story

Torture Team
Torture Team

Rumsfeld's Memo and the Betrayal of American Values

by Philippe Sands

Hardcover, 254 pages | purchase

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