NPR logo

Supreme Court Rules in Sanity Case

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/91703621/91703594" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Supreme Court Rules in Sanity Case

Law

Supreme Court Rules in Sanity Case

Supreme Court Rules in Sanity Case

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/91703621/91703594" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Supreme Court ruled Thursday that even if a criminal defendant is mentally competent to stand trial, he might not have the right to act as his own lawyer.

The court ruled in the case of a man in Indianapolis who suffered from schizophrenia, and was convicted of attempted murder and other charges. He challenged his conviction on the grounds the judge violated his right to self-representation.

Indiana appeals courts agreed with him, but on Thursday the Supreme Court ruled 7-2 that states can give the trial judge the authority to block someone from acting as his own lawyer.

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.