BPP Jukebox: G. Love Plays 'Soft and Sweet'

G. Love Plays 'Soft and Sweet'

Copyright © 2008 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

RACHEL MARTIN, host:

Hey, Michael?

MIKE PESCA, host:

Mm.

MARTIN: Guess what time it is?

MIKE PESCA: It's Martin time.

(Soundbite of laughter)

MARTIN: No. It's not Martin...

PESCA: You're in the Martin standard time zone.

MARTIN: There's no such thing as Martin time. It's BPP jukebox time!

PESCA: All right, fine. I like Martin time better.

MARTIN: Yeah. (Unintelligible)

PESCA: Why are you wearing that oversized clock around your neck if it isn't Martin time, yo, yo, yo?

(Soundbite of laughter)

MARTIN: Could you please stay on message? Today, G. Love & Special Sauce release a new album entitled "Superhero Brother." G. Love stopped by our studio last week to play some tracks from the album. The interview aired the other day, but G. - that's what I call him - laid down a bonus song that was not included in the interview. We kept it in our little pockets, slowly biding our time, waiting, plotting, until today. Here is G. Love with the song "Soft and Sweet." You got a quarter?

PESCA: Now is the moment and here is your quarter.

MARTIN: OK, thank you.

(Soundbite of jukebox)

(Soundbite of song "Soft and Sweet")

Mr. GARRETT DUTTON: (Singing) Chilling out on a ridge by the sea in a ranchito (ph). Cool breeze through the trees sings a song so sweet For my baby and my boo-boo, asleep they lay. I pick up that guitar and then I start to play.

The music was pulsing blood up to my eyes. I surmised the horizon, so rising, surprising. They light up the cloud like they was kids for the first time. Sun was steady rising and I'm sitting in the sunshine.

I hear my baby crying. It is just waking up. I walk through the screen door and go pick him up. Rocka (ph), rocka, rocka, rocka, rocka, rock him back and forth, Baby, quit crying, I go and play some more.

Soft and sweet melody while your mama's sleeping. Let us sleep in late this morning. Let us sleep 'til the sun is burning down, Burning down.

Baby, hold my finger with your little tiny hands. We lounge in the hammock checking out all the land. I smell the sweet scents of a pie and lime. I smell the ocean breeze, the salt on my mind.

I was captivated by your big brown eyes, Which remind me of mine. We know that we're two of a kind. Rocka, rocka, rocka, rocka, rocka, rock him back and forth. Baby, quit crying, and I go and play some more.

Soft and sweet melodies by your mama sleeping. Let us sleep in late this morning. Let us sleep until the sun is burning down, Burning down.

Burning down. Burning down. Burning down.

The day is getting brighter and the wind is breezing down. The whole tree is shaking. Fallen food is on the ground. I smile when I'm thinking about the love I found. Mama's still sleeping so we play these mellow sounds.

Soft and sweet melodies while your mama's sleeping. Let us sleep in late this morning. Let us sleep 'til the sun is burning, burning down.

Soft and sweet melodies while your mama's sleeping. Let us sleep in late this morning. Let us sleep 'til the sun is burning down, Burning down. Burning down. Burning down.

MARTIN: That was G. Love with "Soft and Sweet," live in the BPP Studios. His new album, "Superhero Brother," drops today. Check out video of G. Love's performance at npr.org/bryantpark.

PESCA: You know, G. Love told me a funny little anecdote about that song. It was originally written as a jingle for Sweet'N Low, but it didn't jive with the image that Sweet'N Low was trying to get. They were - it's too saccharin for Sweet'N Low, they said, which is ironic, I thought. And then Alanis Morissette told me something about the song "Ironic."

MARTIN: What?

PESCA: It was supposed to be a jingle for Sweet'N Low.

(Soundbite of laughter)

PESCA: But they didn't feel that the wordplay and misuse of the word "ironic" would actually sell sweetener. Meanwhile, our good friends at Equal and Splenda have swooped into the market...

MARTIN: Stop.

PESCA: And totally taken over market share.

MARTIN: Oh. Stop now.

PESCA: Mm-hm.

MARTIN: Folks, that's it for this hour of the BPP. We are online all the time at npr.org/bryantpark. I'm Rachel Martin.

PESCA: And I am Mike Pesca, and this was the Bryant Park Project from NPR News.

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