Laptops Help Keep Migrant Workers' Kids in School

Juan Medina and Ifrain Ramas with a One Laptop Per Child computer i i

hide captionJuan Medina of the Florida Department of Education meets with new laptop owner Ifrain Ramas and Ifrain's brother and mother. Ifrain and 45 other students from Immokalee, Fla., have received their own laptops through the One Laptop Per Child program.

Larry Abramson/NPR
Juan Medina and Ifrain Ramas with a One Laptop Per Child computer

Juan Medina of the Florida Department of Education meets with new laptop owner Ifrain Ramas and Ifrain's brother and mother. Ifrain and 45 other students from Immokalee, Fla., have received their own laptops through the One Laptop Per Child program.

Larry Abramson/NPR

Immokalee, Fla., is the largest center for migrant farmworkers on the East Coast. Juan Medina, a former agricultural worker, worked the fields with his family, planting onions in west Texas and picking tomatoes in Homestead, Fla.

Medina now works for the Florida Department of Education, trying to help the children of migrant workers deal with the challenges of migrant life.

He is part of a town effort to help the children in school. His new tool is free laptops.

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