Confronting Crime: The Complicated Relationship Between the Media and the FBI Crime is a major beat for reporters, and law enforcement officers are often their best sources. But are journalists and cops after the same thing?
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Confronting Crime: The Complicated Relationship Between the Media and the FBI

Confronting Crime: The Complicated Relationship Between the Media and the FBI

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/91883044/91883034" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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The relationship between the FBI and the media has, at times, been confrontational. The FBI's job is to catch criminals, whereas the media have a responsibility to inform the public. Sometimes, these differing agendas can stand at odds with one another.

John Miller, who's been on both sides of the fence — first as an ABC News reporter and anchor, and now as assistant director of public affairs for the FBI, and NPR's FBI correspondent, Dina Temple-Raston, talk about the relationship between the media and the primary investigative arm of the U.S. Department of Justice.