In Cadeo: 'The Archer'

In Cadeo 300 EP i i
Mike Strapp
In Cadeo 300 EP
Mike Strapp

Jared Scott and Pete Sustarsic recorded In Cadeo's five-song self-titled EP as a studio project with help from friends before the band ever had a proper lineup. Given the grunge-pop sound of "The Archer," the anthemic piano-driven rock of "This Side The Grave" and the slow build-up and cathartic climax of "Communist Lecture," the band proves commanding despite its fledgling nature.

In February, Travis Tonn and Dan Neustadt joined the band. According to Tonn, he was solicited for service to In Cadeo "through AdultFriendFinder.com." He also claims that "Pete and Jared met in a Swiss finishing school." However it came together, the band has only played as a solid unit for four months. "Our first show was May 1," Scott says, "and we have only played three shows to date in Brooklyn and New York City."

From the finger-picked, major-key acoustic-guitar opening of "The Archer," it's fair to expect In Cadeo to romanticize about love and beauty. So when gritty punk guitars kick the song into gear behind the chorus, "All the sinners think they're saints / and all the saints know they're sinners," the turn is exhilarating. The band harnesses an energy that keeps it sounding fresh and vigorous, the way punk rock should.

The band has its EP up on its Web site as a free download. Of course, the band is accepting donations, much like Radiohead did with In Rainbows, but its members say they don't expect to get much out of it. "It's fun to see if anyone pays for something they could legitimately steal," Tonn says. "I think it takes some serious inner guilt issues to do that. That's why I bought all the records that I stole off LimeWire. Except for that last Robbie Williams record. I love the dude, but he totally mailed that one in."

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