Internet Regulator Eases Domain-Name Limits

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The group that oversees the Internet has voted to ease the limits on the suffixes on Web addresses, like .com and .org. It won't be free, but the move opens the door to countless new addresses, including ones with Chinese or Arabic characters.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And our last word in business today is dot anything. The group that oversees the Internet has voted to ease the limits on domain names. Those are the suffixes you see on Internet addresses, like dot com and dot org. The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers - that's actually its name - will start reviewing applications for new domain names next spring.

ARI SHAPIRO, host:

It won't be free, but the move opens the door to countless new addresses. Companies are expected to set up Internet addresses using their brands, like dot Coke or dot Bud Light. And cities are eager to create Web sites like dot NYC.

Perhaps even more significant to the rest of the world, the group has also decided to allow addresses that don't end in Roman letters, which means the biggest proliferation could be in addresses ending in dot Chinese character or dot Arabic script.

And that's the business news from MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee dot Montagne.

SHAPIRO: And I'm Ari Shapiro dot exclamation point.

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