Tony Soprano Outfits Auctioned for Charity

This week, 25 outfits worn by James Gandolfini in The Sopranos were auctioned off to benefit the Wounded Warrior project, a group that aids troops wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan.

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SCOTT SIMON, host:

Just when you thought Tony Soprano had left the scene, he raises his Bada Bada Bing head, this time for a charity. This week, 25 outfits worn by James Gandolfini in the Sopranos were auctioned off to benefit the Wounded Warrior Project, a group that aids troops wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan. The high bid did not go for Tony's signature bathrobe or the black and beige polo shirt, but instead for the shirt, tank top and pants that Tony was wearing when he was shot by the demented Uncle Junior. Mr. Gandolfini who attended the event at Christie's in New York along with one of the wounded soldiers helped bring in over 187,000 dollars for the organization. Don't stop believing.

(Soundbite of Journey's "Small Town Girl")

JOURNEY: (Singing) He took the midnight train going anywhere. A singer in a smoky room, a smell of wine and cheap perfume. For a smile they can share the night. It goes on and on and on and on. Strangers, waiting, walking down the boulevard. Their shadows somewhere in the night. Don't stop...

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