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Road Trippin': Perspectives at the Pump

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Road Trippin': Perspectives at the Pump

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Road Trippin': Perspectives at the Pump

Road Trippin': Perspectives at the Pump

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/92033452/92033444" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

News & Notes spoke with drivers at a gas station near our studios at NPR West. Geoffrey Bennett, NPR hide caption

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Geoffrey Bennett, NPR

Our week-long series, Road Trippin', is focused on the causes and impact of rising gas prices. For more, Farai Chideya speaks with a psychologist, a taxi driver, and a car dealership owner to get their firsthand accounts.

According to Wayne Hochwarter, it's also affecting moods. He's a professor of management at Florida State University's College of Business. Hochwarter talks with Chideya about how $4-per-gallon gas brings out the worst in people.

Then, we hear from Carolyn Robinson, a taxi driver in the nation's capital. She shares how the soaring price of gas is impacting her bottom line.

And with fuel prices moving beyond the $4 mark nationally, sales of large vehicles are hitting a sharp bump in the road. Norris Bishton is feeling it; he owns Airport Marina Honda, a car dealership in Southern California. He explains why he can't offer a good trade-in value for an SUV.