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Ambidextrous Pitcher May Make Leap To Major League

Sports

Ambidextrous Pitcher May Make Leap To Major League

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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Switch hitters are fairly common in baseball. Facing a right-handed pitcher, you bat as a lefty; against a southpaw, you dig in as a righty. The opposite side of the batter's box gives you a better look at the ball and a significant advantage.

What's not so common, at any level of the game, is a switch pitcher. Pitcher Pat Venditte of the Staten Island Yankees, who may become the first full-time major league baseball switch pitcher in 120 years, talks about it.

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