Why We Spend More Using Credit Versus Cash Why is it that people seem to spend more when they use credit cards than when they use cash? The answer could be rooted in psychology. Robert Frank, an economics professor at Cornell University, talks about how the brain works when it comes to paying for goods, and how people can avoid spending too much of their money.
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Why We Spend More Using Credit Versus Cash

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Why We Spend More Using Credit Versus Cash

Why We Spend More Using Credit Versus Cash

Why We Spend More Using Credit Versus Cash

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  • Transcript

Why is it that people seem to spend more when they use credit cards than when they use cash? The answer could be rooted in psychology.

Co-host Ari Shapiro talks with Robert Frank, an economics professor at Cornell University, about how the brain works when it comes to paying for goods, and how people can avoid spending too much of their money.