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Early July 4 Parties In Philly, Mount Vernon

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Early July 4 Parties In Philly, Mount Vernon

Early July 4 Parties In Philly, Mount Vernon

Early July 4 Parties In Philly, Mount Vernon

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  • Transcript

It has always been more than just fireworks and barbecue. Co-host Renee Montagne traces the history of some of the earliest ways Americans celebrated Independence Day.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

If you're planning to take in a fireworks show tonight, allow us to put it in perspective with a little history.

The first official fireworks to mark the Fourth of July were lit in Philadelphia, on the city commons in 1777. The following year, General George Washington honored this day by giving his troops a double allowance of rum. Apparently, by 1822, the revelry had gotten out of hand. George Washington's nephew and heir announced he would no longer allow, quote, "steamboat parties, eating, drinking or dancing on the lawn at Mount Vernon for the Fourth."

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