NPR logo
Homework: Summer Road Trips
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/92271546/92271519" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Homework: Summer Road Trips

From Our Listeners

Homework: Summer Road Trips

Homework: Summer Road Trips
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/92271546/92271519" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

From broken-down minivans to canoes barely secured to the roof — it seems the great American road trip is alive and well. Host Andrea Seabrook shares listeners' tales from the asphalt.

ANDREA SEABROOK, host:

We're back with ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Andrea Seabrook.

Now, your tales of summer road trips. For our Homework segment, we got lots of stories from broken down minivans to canoes barely secured to the roof. Roseanne Delong(ph) was one of eight children growing up. One year her parents rented a summer cottage on Sebago Lake in Maine, sight unseen. The big excitement - it had a game room.

For weeks, all the kids had visions of ping-pong, a pool table, or a piano. But Roseanne writes, the house turned out to be a huge hunting lodge and the game room came complete with about six moose heads, deer in various stages of antler growth, and taxidermied animals all over the place. She writes, all the children stood in the middle of the room screaming and crying.

Some tidbits of wisdom gleamed from your letters from Chris Lavin(ph) in Canyon, California used white chalk on vinyl to separate the backseat between siblings. And John Malinski(ph) of Hammond, Indiana notes that roadkill gets larger as one travels west. Huh. And then there's this from Gayle Girdman(ph). She and her husband, plus their two boys drove from Oregon to Joshua Tree, California on a camping trip.

Ms. GAYLE GIRDMAN (Traveler): My husband and I have one pup tent and the little boys who were four and one at the time were in the tent next to us. We were woken up in the middle of the night by our oldest son, the 4-year-old yelling, Alex, get off of me. And then just a few minutes later, Alex. But his voice sounded much further away.

We peaked out of the tent and the boys tent was rolling downhill. We had not in our, being so tired staked down the tent so we had to dash out, rescue the boys and from then on we have one adult in each of the pup tents when it was windy as that was.

SEABROOK: Important lessons learned on the road. Thanks to everyone for their great stories. For this week's homework, we'd like to hear about your dramatic and brave career changes when work takes a 180. Write to homework@npr.org. Or call the homework hotline at 202-408-5183. Tell us your story and give us a number where we can reach you. Again, it's homework@npr.org or the homework hotline at 202-408-5183.

Copyright © 2008 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.