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Study: News Outlets Scaling Back Iraq Coverage

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Study: News Outlets Scaling Back Iraq Coverage

Analysis

Study: News Outlets Scaling Back Iraq Coverage

Study: News Outlets Scaling Back Iraq Coverage

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Though the Iraq War is in its fifth year, media analysts have tracked a staggering decline in war coverage by American media outlets.

The bloody conflict has all but disappeared from newspaper front pages and network nightly news.

During the first two-and-a-half months of 2008, war coverage accounted for only three percent of airtime on network news, says the Project for Excellence in Journalism.

During that same time last year, the networks devoted nearly one fourth of their time to Iraq.

With the heated horse race for the White House and a badly sagging economy, Iraq has been pushed to the back burner. But at what cost?

Farai Chideya gets answers from Andrew Tyndall, of the TyndallReport.com, and Laura Flanders, host of GRIT TV with Laura Flanders on Dish Network.

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